Posts Tagged ‘Asia’

Captain Rick: This is a bid to clean up Barclay’s reputation and revive profits after a series of damaging scandals. The job cuts will be divided almost equally across its investment and retail banking operations, mainly in continental Europe and Asia. Barclays is also closing its structured capital markets unit, at one time its most profitable business, which focused exclusively on helping clients avoid taxes.
Barclays said it would focus on investment in the U.K., U.S. and Africa while retaining a smaller presence in Europe and Asia to support its global investment bank.

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Captain Rick: Japan, the world’s third largest economy, saw its economic growth sharply contract 3.5% in the third quarter of 2012. If its GDP (Gross National Product) growth rate remains in negative territory during the fourth quarter, Japan will officially fall into recession. Some economists have warned that looks likely. Some believe Japan is in recession already. Many fear that in light of China’s economic contraction, this is wake up call that the entire region might be headed for recession. I will help clear it up in my closing thoughts below.

Japan’s economy, especially exports, has been battered by the 2011 disasters caused by the earthquake, tsunami and subsequent meltdown of several nuclear reactors. China is Japan’s largest trading partner, but its diplomatic spat with China over disputed islands has made Chinese consumers reluctant to buy Japan-made products, especially automobiles.

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Last year nearly 20% of Japanese exports were sold to China, compared to 15.3% to the U.S.

Captain Rick’s closing thoughts on Asia, Europe and the USA:

Japan has been busy gobbling up U.S. debt over the past year. Its current holdings of $1.12 Trillion might soon pass the current top holder of U.S. debt … China at $1.15 Trillion. I find this very interesting and hope to focus on it in an upcoming report as America nears the “Fiscal Cliff”.

To help clear up the controversy of whether or not Southeast Asia is headed for recession, we should consider the problems that our friends in Europe face. Several countries in Europe are already in recession and more on the brink. Europe is facing a very serious financial challenge.

The most serious of all world financial problems lies in the United States of America. Its called the “Fiscal Cliff”. If this financial “nightmare” is not addressed head on with real and meaningful cuts in spending, coupled with increases in taxes, I assure that the negative financial echo effect will have the potential to thrust all countries of our world into recession. Watch for more of my reports on this matter of major global importance.

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Captain Rick: The World Bank lowered its growth outlook for Asia on Monday, and warned that a major unraveling in Europe could knock 2% off Asia’s GDP growth next year.

The institute warned of even slower growth in China and Asia if the Eurozone debt crisis were to cause a disruption of financial markets in Europe, or the so-called fiscal cliff in the United States went unresolved. A “major” Eurozone crisis could reduce growth in Asia by 2% next year, while the fiscal cliff would erase another 1%.

Weaker demand for East Asia’s exports is slowing the regional economy, but compared to other parts of the world, it’s still growing strongly.

The World Bank also forecasts a slowdown in China, where growth has been relatively tepid. GDP growth will fall to 7.7% this year, the institute predicts.

The downgrade is latest in a series as economists adjust expectations for China. Swiss banking giant UBS last month lowered its China GDP forecast to 7.5% from 8%.
Goldman Sachs has issued a slightly less dour outlook for China growth — dropping it to 7.6% from 8.0%.
While China is still growing fast, especially compared to less than 2% growth in the United States, it marks an uncomfortable soft patch for the world’s second largest economy. Over the last three decades, China has barreled ahead at an average growth rate of about 10% a year.

Economic momentum in China is expected to be weak during the coming months.