Archive for the ‘Greece’ Category

Captain Rick: The 17-nation Eurozone economy contracted for a record sixth consecutive quarter, making this the longest period of recession in the Eurozone’s history. The recession has depressed business confidence, sent unemployment to record highs, inflation to record lows and blown attempts to cut government record debt.

Gross domestic product in the Eurozone fell by 0.2% in the first quarter. The GDP estimate was worse than economists were expecting, largely due to disappointing growth in Germany and could increase pressure on the ECB to take further action to try to stimulate activity.

Unemployment continues to hit new record highs. Unemployment broke through 12% for the first time in March, meaning 19.2 million people were without work in the Eurozone, 1.7 million more than a year ago.
Youth unemployment rose sharply, hitting 24% and leaving 3.6 million people under 25 looking for work.

Prices slumped and inflation has fallen way below the central bank’s target. Inflation posted its biggest monthly drop in four years in April. It fell to 1.2% and touched its lowest level since February 2010.

Eurozone debt hit 8.6 trillion euros, a record 90% of GDP, last year and is forecast to rise to 95% in 2013. As bad as this is … in contrast, U.S. debt to GDP ratio is 107%, trumping it as the worlds worst. One has to wonder if America is next in line to experience the hardships facing those in the Eurozone.

Future Concern: Economists are becoming increasingly concerned at the growing divergence between France and Germany, historically the twin motors of the EU economy and political integration.

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France: French President Francois Hollande (shown above) who was elected a year ago after campaigning to put growth before austerity and introduce higher taxes on the rich, has seen his approval ratings fall sharply as unemployment continues to climb. In recent months he has begun to reform labor markets and pensions, and announced plans to cut capital gains tax. But he is moving too slowly for some, and his government continues to send mixed messages.

France, the Eurozone’s second-biggest economy, slipped back into recession. Its output fell by 0.2% for a second consecutive quarter as it suffered from weak exports and falling investment.  France faces a heavy financial burden from its labor unions and pension systems.

Italy: The pace of contraction eased. GDP shrank by 0.5% in the quarter.
Italy, the region’s third largest economy, nominated a new prime minister. Enrico Letta is a pro-European from Italy’s center-left. He wants Europe to ease up on austerity.

Spain: The recession deepened in the first quarter. The economy contracted by 2% compared with the same period a year ago, and by 0.5% compared with the final quarter of 2012. Spain has been stuck in recession for 21 months. It has been given two more years to bring its budget deficit to below 3% of gross domestic product. In contrast, the U.S. deficit ratio is 6.5% of GDP … more than twice as bad. One has to wonder if America is next in line to experience the hardships facing those in the Eurozone.

The number of unemployed in Spain broke the 6 million barrier during the first quarter, a new record. The unemployment rate rose to 27.2%, tied with Greece for the Eurozone’s highest. For Spaniards aged 16 to 24, the unemployment rate is 57.2%.

Greece: The jobless rate was 27.2% for January, tied with Spain for the Eurozone’s highest. In Greece, 34.2% individuals aged 25 to 34 are unemployed. It’s even worse for younger workers — 59.3% of Greeks aged 15 to 24 are out of work.

Portugal: Portugal was able to slow the pace of contraction to 0.3% from 1.8% in the fourth quarter.

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Info from previous reports:

European Debt Crisis: https://atridim.wordpress.com/category/european-debt-crisis/

Europe: https://atridim.wordpress.com/category/europe/

France: https://atridim.wordpress.com/category/france/

Germany: https://atridim.wordpress.com/category/germany/

Greece: https://atridim.wordpress.com/category/greece/

Italy: https://atridim.wordpress.com/category/italy/

Portugal: https://atridim.wordpress.com/category/portugal/

Spain: https://atridim.wordpress.com/category/spain/

Home page (all reports): https://atridim.wordpress.com/

Captain Rick: Eurostat data published Tuesday showed unemployment in the 17-nation Eurozone hit a record high of 11.8% in November, leaving 18.8 million people without work – two million more than a year ago.
At nearly 27%, Spain has the highest unemployment rate in the European Union, and youth unemployment is more than twice as high at 56%. Thousands of Spanish bank employees will lose their jobs as a result of an EU-backed bailout of Spanish banks. Only Greece, which is facing a sixth year of recession, has a greater proportion of young people out of work.

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The Eurozone economy shrank in the second and third quarters of 2012, and official data due next month are expected to confirm a contraction in fourth quarter output.

Forecasts for 2013 are not much better, ranging from stagnation to another year of recession as governments continue to grapple with the fallout of the credit crisis, cutting spending and raising taxes to rein in budget deficits.

Hopes that stronger growth in Asia and the U.S. could spark a Eurozone recovery also took a knock, as Germany said its exports fell 3.4% in November, from the previous month, and were flat year over year.

View other reports about Europe: https://atridim.wordpress.com/category/europe/

Captain Rick: Unemployment in the 17 country Eurozone hit a record high in September of 11.6%, up 1.2% from a year ago. The sluggish economies of Spain, Greece and Portugal lead the pack with unemployment rates above 25%.  Portugal is at 15.7%. Austria has the lowest rate of 5.2%, followed by Germany and the Netherlands at 5.4%.

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The unemployment rate for the entire 27 member-states of the European Union, including countries that do not use the Euro, was unchanged at 10.6%, up from 9.8% a year ago. The total number of of unemployed people in this area rose by 169.000 to 25.75 million.

Captain Rick:  Click and Play the video below to get an excellent 3 minute summation of the world’s 5 Global Risks, each of which can completely change the global outlook. There are two in Europe, one in the Far East, one in the Middle East and one in the U.S. … the pending Fiscal Cliff … potentially the biggest global risk of them all. 3 Fiscal Cliff scenarios are discussed of which one is following the current course of doing nothing. This would cause a 4% contraction in GDP and cast the U.S. into Recession. For the first time in a very long time our kid’s generation would be worse off than ours. Two other scenarios are discussed that offer hope. The conversation includes a statement that a fix must include compromise of tax increases and entitlement cuts. Mathematically, the problem can’t be fixed by addressing one side only.  We are fortunate that we have a currency that everybody still wants, so we still have some time to get it right by enacting proper tax and entitlement reform. We just need politicians that are willing to compromise, which could be the most difficult job of all.

FORTUNE Video by PIMCO CEO: http://money.cnn.com/video/magazines/fortune/2012/10/04/f-el-erian-pimco-ceo-global-risks.fortune/

The Buzz - Investment and Stock Market News

The fate of Europe’s latest rescue fund will be decided this week by a high court in Germany.

At issue is an injunction that would block the German parliament from ratifying the international treaty governing the European Stability Mechanism, or ESM.

The ESM is a key component of the “breakthrough” agreement announced in June by euro area leaders, including German Chancellor Angela Merkel, that is aimed at stabilizing financial markets and strengthening the region’s banking system. The German Constitutional Court is expected to rule on the issue Wednesday.

The stakes are potentially high for Spain, which is widely expected to tap the ESM in order to qualify for the European Central Bank’s new bond buying program. Spain has already requested up to €100 billion in bailout loans to recapitalize its banking sector.

Italy could also come under pressure if the court rules against the ESM, since many investors see…

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